Ngahtatgyi Paya

The five-storey Buddha at the Ngahtatgyi PayaSouth of the Chaukhtatgyi Paya lies the Ngahtatgyi Paya, located in the Ashay Tawya monastery. The centerpiece of the temple is the magnificent five storey high Buddha, shown in the photo to the left. A young samanera takes part in the shinpyu ceremonyThe day we visited the monastery was an auspicious one, as we were able to observe the initiation of several young boys as novice monks. The ceremony inducts boys from 5 to 15, and is called the shinpyu ceremony. Most boys participate in this first entry into monastic life (a more permanent state of monasticism, pongyi, is entered into by fully ordained monks sometime after the age of 20). The photo to the right shows an excited young samanera or novitiate, at the start of the shinpyu ceremony.
 
 
 
 
 
 

The novice, bedecked in ceremonial garb The shinpyu ceremony is a common event, as a family earns great merit when a son The truimphant processionalforsakes his childhood life and dons the robe of the monk. Henceforth, he will have no possessions, save the bowl with which he begs his meals. Few novices remain in the order long enough to take their ordained vows, but clearly the initiation of the novice is cause for a huge celebration. As you can see from the eager participant to the left, the monk-to-be is bedecked in finery. After offering prayers and agreeing to the 10 precepts or vows, the novice is carried several times in a grand procession around the perimeter of the temple, as shown in the photo to the right. Following this, he is whisked off to the nearby Off to the monastery!monastery to begin his training. (below, left) The young monks pictured a the Chaukhtatgyi Paya were also young novitiates. The period of religious servitude is rather short; a novice usually lasts a week or two, with nine days being considered an auspicious number. Although our young novitiates actually stay in the order may be short, the active participation of most young men in the process cements the daily bond of Buddhist beliefs and daily life, instilling him with an appreciation of its spiritual message.
 
 






Return to Yangon Main Page
Return to Yangon Main Page